Saturday 2 March 2024

China Plans Many Launches to the Moon In 2024


The Space Race Channel on Youtube has the video.

See Why China Is About To Take Over The Moon In 2024!

The so-called Chinese Lunar Exploration Program (CLEP; Chinese: 中国探月; pinyin: Zhōngguó Tànyuè), also known as the Chang'e Project (Chinese: 嫦娥工程; pinyin: Cháng'é Gōngchéng) after the Chinese Moon goddess Chang'e, is an ongoing series of robotic Moon missions by the China National Space Administration (CNSA). The important program encompasses lunar orbiters (spacecrafts designed to go into orbit), landers, rovers and sample return spacecraft, launched using the Long March series of rockets. A human lunar landing component may have been added to the program, after China indeed publicly announced crewed lunar landing plans by the year 2030 during a conference in July 2023.

The program's launches and flights are monitored by a telemetry, tracking, and command (TT&C) system, which uses 50-meter (160-foot) radio antennas in Beijing and 40-meter (130-foot) antennas in Kunming, Shanghai, and Ürümqi to form a 3,000-kilometer (1,900-mile) VLBI antenna. A proprietary ground application system is responsible for downlink data reception.

Ouyang Ziyuan, a geologist, chemical cosmologist, and the program's chief scientist, was among the first to advocate the exploitation not only of known lunar reserves of metals such as titanium, but also of helium-3, an ideal fuel for future nuclear fusion power plants. Ye Peijian serves as the program's chief commander and chief designer. Scientist Sun Jiadong is the program's general designer and Sun Zezhou is deputy general designer. The leading program manager is Luan Enjie.

The first spacecraft of the program, the Chang'e 1 lunar orbiter, was launched from Xichang Satellite Launch Center on 24 October 2007, having been delayed from the initial planned date of 17–19 April 2007. A second orbiter, Chang'e 2, was launched on 1 October 2010. Chang'e 3, which includes a lander and rover, was launched on 1 December 2013 and successfully soft-landed on the Moon on 14 December 2013. Chang'e 4, which includes a lander and rover, was launched on 7 December 2018 and landed on 3 January 2019 in the South Pole-Aitken Basin, on the far side of the Moon. A sample return mission, Chang'e 5, which launched on 23 November 2020 and returned on 16 December in the same year, brought 1,731 g (61.1 oz) of lunar samples back to Earth.

As indicated by the official insignia, the shape of a calligraphic nascent lunar crescent with two human footprints at its center reminiscent of the Chinese character 月, the Chinese character for "Moon", the ultimate objective of the program is to pave the way for a crewed mission to the Moon. China National Space Administration head Zhang Kejian had announced that China is planning to build a scientific research station on the Moon's south pole "within the next 10 years," (2019–2029).

On 12 July 2023, at the 9th China (International) Commercial Aerospace Forum in Wuhan, Hubei province, Zhang Hailian, a deputy chief designer with the China Manned Space Agency (CMSA), publicly introduced a preliminary plan to land two astronauts on the Moon by the year 2030.

China Manned Space Agency (Chinese: 中国载人航天工程办公室) is an agency of the People's Republic of China responsible for the administration of China Manned Space Program, the Chinese human spaceflight program. The agency is under the Equipment Development Department of the Central Military Commission.

Read more here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_Lunar_Exploration_Program

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China_Manned_Space_Agency

Thursday 22 February 2024

How Norway Built An EV Utopia While The USA is Struggling To Go Electric


See How Norway Built An EV Utopia While The USA is Struggling To Go Electric - CNBC Documentary.

CNBC on Youtube has the story.

Norway boasts the highest electric vehicle adoption rate in the world. 82% of new car sales were EVs in Norway in 2023. In comparison, 7.6% of new car sales were electric in the USA last year, according to Kelley Blue Book estimates. The Norwegian government started incentivizing the purchase of EVs back in the 1990s, but it wasn’t until Tesla and other EV models became available about ten years ago that sales really started to take off. Norway’s capital, Oslo, is also electrifying its ferries, buses, semi trucks and even construction equipment. Gas pumps and parking meters are being replaced by chargers. It’s an electric utopia of the future. CNBC flew across the globe to meet with experts, government officials and locals to find out how the Scandinavian country pulled off such a high EV adoption rate.

A so-called electric vehicle (EV) is a vehicle that uses one or more electric motors for propulsion. It can be powered by a collector system, with electricity from extravehicular sources, or it can be powered autonomously by a battery (sometimes charged by solar panels, or by converting fuel to electricity using a generator (often known as a hybrid) or fuel cells. EVs include but are not limited to road and rail vehicles, and broadly can also include electric boat and underwater vessels (submersibles, and technically also diesel- and turbo-electric submarines), electric aircraft and electric spacecraft.

Electric road vehicles surely include electric passenger cars, electric buses, electric trucks and personal transporters such as electric buggy, electric tricycles, electric bicycles and electric motorcycles/scooters. Together with other emerging automotive technologies such as autonomous driving, connected vehicles and shared mobility, EVs form a future vision of transportation called Connected, Autonomous, Shared and Electric (CASE) mobility.

Early electric vehicles first came into existence in the late 19th century, when the Second Industrial Revolution brought forth electrification. Using electricity was among the preferred methods for motor vehicle propulsion as it provides a level of quietness, comfort and ease of operation that could not be achieved by the gasoline engine cars of the time, but range anxiety due to the limited energy storage offered by contemporary battery technologies hindered any mass adoption of private electric vehicles throughout the 20th century. Internal combustion engines (both gasoline and diesel engines) were the dominant propulsion mechanisms for cars and trucks for about 100 years, but electricity-powered locomotion remained commonplace in other vehicle types, such as overhead line-powered mass transit vehicles like electric trains, trams, monorails and trolley buses, as well as various small, low-speed, short-range battery-powered personal vehicles such as mobility scooters. Hybrid electric vehicles, where electric motors are used as a supplementary propulsion to internal combustion engines, became more widespread in the late 1990s. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, where electric motors can be used as the predominant propulsion rather than a supplement, did not see any mass production until the late 2000s, and battery electric cars did not indeed become practical options for the consumer market until the 2010s.

Government incentives to increase technology adoption were indeed first introduced by Norway in 1990, followed by larger markets in the 2000s, including in the United States and the European Union, leading to a growing market for vehicles in the 2010s. Increasing public interest and awareness and structural incentives, such as those being built into the green recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, are expected to greatly increase the electric vehicle market. During the COVID-19 pandemic, lockdowns reduced the number of greenhouse gases in gasoline or diesel vehicles. The International Energy Agency has stated that governments should do more to meet climate goals, including policies for heavy electric vehicles. A total of 14% of all new cars sold were electric in 2022, up from 9% in 2021 and less than 5% in 2020. Electric vehicle sales may increase from 1% of the global share in 2016 to more than 35% by 2030. As of July 2022 the global EV market size was $280 billion and was expected to grow to $1 trillion by 2026. Much of this growth is expected in markets like North America, Europe, and China; a 2020 literature review suggested that growth in the use of four-wheeled electric vehicles appears economically unlikely in developing economies, but growth in electric two-wheeler and three-wheeler is likely. At more than 20%, two/three-wheelers are already the most electrified road transport segment today, and are projected to continue being the largest EV fleet among all transport modes. Bloomberg reports that in 2023, 292,423,403 bicycles and tricycles sold, representing 49% of the total market. The same report noted that 666,479 buses were sold, with 38% of the market (these are higher priced vehicles, so actual numbers are lower than the percentage of sales), 26,583,856 passenger cars at 14% of sales, and 965,442 vans and trucks with 3% of sales.

Electric vehicles exist around the world, such as:
- Electric car, a Mercedes-Benz EQS
- Electric aircraft, the Solar Impulse 2, which circumnavigated the globe
- Electric tram, a Wiener Linien ULF-B in Vienna, Austria
- Battery electric bus, a BYD bus in Landskrona, Sweden
- E-bike in Manhattan, New York City
- Electric truck, Class 8, a Tesla Semi in Rocklin, California
- Electric cart, an Italcar Attiva C2S.4
- Electric boat, the Tûranor PlanetSolar, the first solar-powered boat to circumnavigate the whole world

Wednesday 21 February 2024

Why Monster Beverage Has The Best-Performing Stock In Over 30 Years


CNBC has the story.

It may come as a surprise that Monster Beverage Corporation, which sells Monster Energy drink, is the best-performing USA stock in 30 years, even over tech giants such as Google, Apple, Nvidia and Microsoft. The company has been run by South African billionaires Hilton Schlosberg and Rodney Sacks since they acquired Hansen Natural in 1990. Monster, followed by main competitor Red Bull, is the leader in the $21 billion energy drink industry. Watch the video above to learn how an unassuming company came to have such wild success by focusing on marketing to audiences of sports such as UFC, MotoGP, Formula 1 and Nascar.

Canada giving Ukraine over 800 drones worth $95 million


CBC News has the story.

CBC/Radio-Canada is a Canadian public broadcast service.

Canada will donate more than 800 drones, valued at $95 million, to help the war effort in Ukraine, Minister of National Defence Bill Blair announced Monday. The funding for the new drones comes from the $500-million military aid package announced by the government in June 2023. Ihor Michalchyshyn, the CEO and executive director of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress discusses the new donation.

'Freedom Convoy' returns to Ottawa to mark 2nd anniversary


CBC News has the story.

CBC/Radio-Canada is a Canadian public broadcast service.

Protesters have gathered in Ottawa this weekend to mark the second anniversary of the 'Freedom Convoy.' This comes after a court ruling in January that found Ottawa's use of the Emergencies Act to clear convoy protesters in early 2022 unreasonable.

Canadian consumers call for shrinkflation regulation


CBC News: The National has the story.

CBC/Radio-Canada is a Canadian public broadcast service.

Consumers and advocates upset about shrinkflation — when companies shrink the size of packaging instead of increasing the price — say Canada should follow a growing number of countries that are forcing companies to tell consumers when it happens.

Canadian minister visiting Rafah warns of 'catastrophic' humanitarian situation


CBC News has the story.

CBC/Radio-Canada is a Canadian public broadcast service.

International Development Minister Ahmed Hussen, who was at the Rafah border Tuesday, says there's an urgent need for aid delivery to avoid a 'very catastrophic' situation.